The Week in Links - 12/4/2010

Full-Ack: an Emacs interface to Ack
Ack is a useful little app for searching source code. If you ever use grep for finding things in your code, switch to ack immediately - you won’t regret it. This is a handy front end to ack for Emacs users.

Information architecture: A How to
I’ve been learning about information architecture lately as it’s becoming increasingly important for my job. This is a good overview.

Hacker’s Guide To Tea
I need to drink more tea. This article taught me a lot I didn’t know about tea and its benefits.

Tasty Treats for PostgreSQL
A bunch of useful tools if you work with PostgreSQL, from the guys at OmniTI.

HTML5Rocks - Introducing Web Sockets: Bringing Sockets to the Web
An introduction to Web Sockets, which let you do lots of cool real time things with the web. One of many things I need to spend more time experimenting with.

The Week in Links - 11/11/2010

Things You Should Do Immediately After Launching a Website
Some of these are common sense, but there are quite a few non-obvious ones here. A good checklist.

Running Shells in Emacs: An Overview | Mastering Emacs
Working with shells in Emacs is very useful; I almost always have a small one running at the bottom of my window to run commands in. This explains the differences between the different kinds of shells in Emacs, how to use them, and how to change their settings.

Announcing Cloud Load Balancing Private Beta | Rackspace Cloud Computing & Hosting
Rackspace Cloud, where I host a ton of different servers for myself and for clients, has announced a beta of their load balancing service. Good load balancing is a pain to set up, so this is promising.

The 1140px CSS Grid System/Framework · Fluid down to mobile
Nice new CSS grid framework that handles multiple screen sizes with ease. It seems like a fundamental failing of CSS that we need all these frameworks to do really basic stuff like this though.

Dr Nic’s Making CI easier to do than not to with Hudson CI and Vagrant
I need to spend some time with Hudson. It’s an incredibly powerful “Continuous Integration” server, but it does a lot more as well. This article explains how to use it in conjunction with Vagrant to automatically set up your test environment.

How to Use Your Zoom Lens as a Compositional Aid
I’ve been learning photography over the last couple of years. This article did a better job of explaining the effects of using different kinds of zoom lenses. The pictures that accompany the article are worth 1000 words and then some.

Links for 5/27/2008

I’ve built up a big backlog of links. Here’s the first batch.

Unix Command Line Kung-Fu

33 Pages of command line goodness. I’ve been rocking the command line for almost a decade, but there’s a ton of stuff here I didn’t know.

Update : Hal Pomeranz, who created this document, sent me an email with a link to the PDF version of the document. You can find it here. Thanks Hal!

Erlang vs. Scala

I want to experiment with both of these languages.

21 Ruby Tips You Should Be Using In Your Own Code

The title is self-descriptive, and as you would expect from Ruby Inside there are a lot of nice shortcuts here.

Community Engine: A Social Networking Plugin for Ruby on Rails

This has been pretty well publicized, but here it is in case you missed it. Community Engine allows you to add social networking capabilities (profiles, photos, blogs, forums, and more) to any application simply by adding this plugin. Extracted from live websites, so it is real-world tested.

Awaken

Awaken is a slick little app for OS X that I picked up as part of the MacHeist bundle. I’ve used it as a timer for those occassions when I need to force myself to work on something for “Just 10 minutes”, but here are some other uses.

Links for 4/2

A list of random and assorted things I have found lately

New York Times blog on open source technology at the Times

“A blog about open source technology at The New York Times, written by and primarily for developers. This includes our own projects, our work with open-source technologies at nytimes.com, and other interesting topics in the open source and Web 2.0 worlds.”

There are a lot of nice posts in there, including one on how they used EC2 to convert their archives to PDF.

Desert Rails Plugin

Desert is a component framework for Rails that allows you to seamlessly define in your plugins: * Models * Controllers * Views * Helpers * Routes * Migrations * Plugin Dependencies

I’m going to check this out for something I’m about to start on.

Five Runs Interviews

Five Runs is conducting a series of 5-question interviews. So far they have interviewed Chad Fowler, Michael Cote and Peter Cooper.

Arc is Released

Paul Graham has released Arc, his long-awaited Lisp dialect.

Arc is designed above all for exploratory programming: the kind where you decide what to write by writing it. A good medium for exploratory programming is one that makes programs brief and malleable, so that’s what we’ve aimed for. This is a medium for sketching software.

How to be a Great Dad - 12 Awesome Tips | Zen Habits

‘nuff said.

Links for 1/29/08

A list of random and assorted things I have found lately

New York Times blog on open source technology at the Times

“A blog about open source technology at The New York Times, written by and primarily for developers. This includes our own projects, our work with open-source technologies at nytimes.com, and other interesting topics in the open source and Web 2.0 worlds.”

There are a lot of nice posts in there, including one on how they used EC2 to convert their archives to PDF.

Desert Rails Plugin

Desert is a component framework for Rails that allows you to seamlessly define in your plugins: * Models * Controllers * Views * Helpers * Routes * Migrations * Plugin Dependencies

I’m going to check this out for something I’m about to start on.

Five Runs Interviews

Five Runs is conducting a series of 5-question interviews. So far they have interviewed Chad Fowler, Michael Cote and Peter Cooper.

Arc is Released

Paul Graham has released Arc, his long-awaited Lisp dialect.

Arc is designed above all for exploratory programming: the kind where you decide what to write by writing it. A good medium for exploratory programming is one that makes programs brief and malleable, so that’s what we’ve aimed for. This is a medium for sketching software.