A Collection of Great Tools for the Ruby Developer

I’ve been a bit heads-down lately, working on a super-secret project in Ruby. More on that in the near future, but in the meantime I wanted to share about a few things that I’ve started using.

Shoulda

When I started my new project, I wanted to try one of the new testing frameworks for Ruby. The problem is there are a number to choose from. What to do…

I settled on Shoulda. I wish I could tell you that this was a rigorous process, that I evaluated each framework carefully, learning about each one’s strengths and weaknesses. I did not, I cheated. You see, a while back, Josh Susser did just that thing. He called it the The Great Test Framework Dance-off. He settled on Shoulda, so that’s what I went with.

Shoulda is developed by Tammer Saleh of ThoughtBot, who have a number of other really nice projects. Shoulda’s tagline is “Making Tests Easy on the Fingers and Eyes”, and it lives up to that goal. It has a very nice syntax for developing tests, including a complete set of macros for testing controllers and models. It’s a joy to use. Here’s what it looks like (both samples taken from the Shoulda README :

Nice, right?

Here’s a sample of the ActiveRecord macros in action:

Beautiful.

So what’s the big deal? Well, it’s easier to read for one. Instead of horrendous method names like test_should_do_this_but_not_that, you get to write English: should “do this but not that”. The macros in Shoulda also let you test your models and controllers easily.

Pivotal Tracker

Pivotal Tracker is an Agile project management tool, developed by the folks at Pivotal Labs. It lets you create projects, track release, stories, and defects. The beauty of Tracker is it’s all-on-one-screen user interface. It lets you see everything at a glance, and even provides keyboard shortcuts for common tasks. I’m not alone in my admiration of Tracker, it seems to be extremely popular among the Rails consulting shops (Hashrocket, for one).

While Tracker is powerful enough to be used for large multi-developer projects, it also happens to be perfect for managing your side projects. Enter the features you want, organize them into releases, and just click start to begin the first one. Click finish when you’re done, and move on to the next one. Easy peasy. Did I mention it’s free?

Be sure to check out the screencast, which gives a nice overview of the application.

HTTParty

John Nunemaker is a prolific Ruby and Rails developer, as witnessed by a quick glance at his Github page. One of his most recent projects is HTTParty, which makes it dead-simple to consume REST apis using Ruby. Here’s what it looks like:

HTTParty automatically detects whether the response is JSON or XML and parses it appropriately. It really doesn’t get much easier than that. There’s also a nice command-line app bundled with the gem that lets you call RESTful web services easily from the command-line, with a few more bells and whistles than curl.

Sinatra

Sinatra is a great, compact web framework similar in concept to Why the Lucky Stiff’s Camping framework. It makes it trivial to create a web application in just a few lines of code. It was originally written by XXX to allow for creating lightweight web services, but has since become quite popular as a web framework to use when Rails might be overkill.

It’s easy to create simple test applications for libraries, but also robust enough to create full-blown websites with. Check out the Sinatra website and the Sinatra book for more details.

What tools have you discovered lately?

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About Larry Wright
Curious person. Maker of things.